Tag Archive for web 2.0

Two Interactive jobs in Vancouver.

I always love it when I can post a good job opportunity. And today I can post two.

The good people at Fjord Vancouver, the interactive wing of Cossette , Canada’s largest ad agency, is hiring two positions.

The first job could be a good reason to move to Vancouver. The second is a mat leave replacement contract for one year.

Good luck!

Rob Cottingham is smarter than any of us.

Rob CottinghamI’ve written about my friend Rob Cottingham before. He scribes the fantastic web 2.0 cartoon Noise To Signal, which I’ve written about recently.

Rob gave the keynote at this year’s Northern Voice, Vancouver’s major blogging and social media conference. I wasn’t able to be at NV09, but I knew when Rob’s keynote started, because I saw Twitter light up with fantastic praise, reviews and general hilarity.

Here’s how his keynote was described:

Rob Cottingham takes a lightning tour through both the intentionally and accidentally hilarious sides of social media, with a presentation that’s half stand-up comedy, half provocative treatise, and half meditation on why he can never get fractions to add up properly.

He is just a truly funny man. Not just anyone could riff for twenty minutes on what makes social media funny. Rob can.

So I am very excited that his keynote is now available for embedding, because I was truly bummed to have missed it.

With no further ado, here, my friends, is Rob Cottingham’s keynote addresss, “Teh Funny” (enjoy!):

You can also download this clip to your iPod.

PS: Rob can be found on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, his blog and his Social Signal blog. It is my intention that within this single blog post you will go from not knowing who Rob is, to being intrigued, finding out more, learning all about him and then becoming totally sick of him. You’re welcome.

PPS: The quality of this broadcast is phenomenal. See how it was done.

Looking forward to Finance 2.0.

The Finance 2.0 SummitA few months ago I was put in touch with Kristin Rodriguez at Financial Research Associates who was starting to put together a conference about social media and finance. She was calling it Finance 2.0, but beyond that she was simply seeking advice and support to put on a great conference.

Over the next few weeks, we spoke a lot, and she caught on extremely quickly, talking to many of the best and the brightest in the online world of banking innovation. The result is that I’m on the advisory board of what should be an amazing conference at the intersection of community engagement and banking.

Some of the highlights I’m completely looking forward to are (and no offence at all to the people on the agenda I’m overlooking):

  • Trey ReemeAre You a Spider or a Fly? Defining Your Relationship with the Web
  • Ron ShevlinWhy Are We Talking About Finance 2.0 When We Haven’t Figured Out Finance 1.0?
  • Tim McAlpineYoung & Free Alberta: Integrating Marketing & Social Media to Connect with Consumers
  • Ed TerpeningCrashing the Party: Are Financial Institutions Welcomed on the Social Media Scene?
  • Shari StormBest Practices in Blogging: How to Maximize the Benefits of This New Medium
  • Morriss ParteePerfecting Your Palette: Recipes for a Successful Social Marketing Campaign
  • Jeffry PilcherResults 2.0: Using Web 2.0 Tools to Achieve Real Business Objectives

I’ve heard many of these speakers before, and I’m looking forward to hearing from them again

My session is called Using Social Media to Connect With Your Community: It Really Does Change Everything. I’m excited and honoured to be sharing the stage with these amazing thinkers and experts.

I am particularly excited to finally meet the amazing Ed Terpening in person. He will be chairing the whole event, and his take on things should prove illuminating and insightful.

I’m also really excited to hear from Jeffry Pilcher. After meeting him this weekend at BarCampBankBC, and catching his energy and enthusiasm, plus after reading Gene Blishen’s review of a recent presentation, I imagine he will close out the two-day conference with a bang.

If you’re looking for a conference on the future of financial services marketing and engagement, check out The Finance 2.0 SummitChanneling the convergence of social media and finance: Practical marketing strategies to connect with your customer. Coming to New York January 26-27th, 2009.

Let me know if I’ll see you there!

Welcome to the new ChangeEverything.ca!

ChangeEverything.caLadies and gentlemen, I introduce you to the the brand new ChangeEverything.ca.

This has been a long time in the works. Since we launched two years ago, we have identified new functionality we wanted, usability issues we wanted to resolve and design enhancements we wanted to make. With this relaunch, we got almost everything we wanted.

The site revolves much more around the people now, and not just around text. It’s easier to use. And it’s pretty too.

This project would not have been possible without Kate Dugas, who has animated this community in an amazing way. This relaunch is a testament to her vision of what our community could be.

I want to thank Currency Marketing for designing such an amazing site. And Affinity Bridge, an amazing development shop that understands how to harness technology to build community.

I hope you enjoy.

Social Media Marketing Best Practice: Community Engagement

About a week ago, Morriss Partee blogged this: Social Media Marketing Best Practice: Use multiple media.

In this post, he tagged me, along with a few others, to continue a topic of Social Media Marketing Best Practices started on the Twist Image blog by digital marketing guru Mitch Joel.

He asked me to continue this thread by adding my two cents, so here goes.

My Social Media Marketing Best Practice is Community Engagement:

I used to call it Web 2.0, but that seemed to focus too much on technology. So I started calling it Social Media, but I think that focuses too much on the tools and leads us to jump to solutions before we fully grasp the issue we’re trying to address. Now I simply call it Community Engagement. The most important thing is to never lose sight of our core objective: People. We need to keep the people we’re trying to engage in a conversation front and centre, and develop a plan to inspire participation around a relevant topic, event, issue, brand, product or service.

I hope this thought furthers the conversation a little.

Thanks Morriss!